Book Review: Macbeth

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Macbeth is the valiant soldier and righteous man every king wants at his side. After the Thane of Cawdor betrays King Duncan, Macbeth is the one to dispatch him. Unknown to Macbeth, the King plans to promote him to Thane of Cawdor. So while he walks with his friend Banquo, the weird sisters find him and prophesy that he will be Thane and King someday.

But it is his wife, Lady Macbeth, that taps into his mind and convinces him to murder King Duncan to get what he wants. She questions his manhood and questions his love for her until he agrees. So while Duncan is visiting his home, Macbeth murders him in the night. Macbeth instantly feels the guilt his wife doesn’t.

Later, the weird sister’s prophesy gets to him. They said Banquo would sire kings, so Macbeth hires a murderer to kill Banquo and his son. Banquo dies but his son gets away. Macbeth goes on a killing spree, killing anyone related to anyone who could dethrone him. Macbeth and his wife go crazy and they both die in the end and a new King of Scotland is named.

I think Lady Macbeth was one of the most interesting characters. She was so powerful. She was able to get into Macbeth’s head and convince him to do whatever she wished.

The main theme of the play, in my opinion, was defining what is means to be a man. At first we see that being a man means to win battles and gain title. But then when Macbeth isn’t ambitious enough to kill, Lady Macbeth calls him a woman. The one character who shows a balanced personality is Macduff. After his wife and children are killed, he begins to mourn and his friend tells him to “be a man” and go revenge them. Macduff agrees but also says that he is human and must mourn for them.

In the play, there is also a loss of parentage. Duncan starts out as both a mother and father figure but because he let is trust override his caution, he dies. The rest of the play is his “children” running around confused and killing one another.

I give this play 4 out of 5 stars.

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